What was important about the emancipation proclamation

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what was important about the emancipation proclamation

Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln



The Emancipation Proclamation is a moving and thought provoking document. It demonstrates a Presidents conviction to create change for the better good of all people in spite of the opposition of the times. During the Civil Rights movement of the 60s President Lyndon Johnson reminded us that emancipation is still a proclamation and not a fact until justice is blind to color, until education is unaware of race, until opportunity is unconcerned with color of mens skins. This document has stood the test of time. It was relevant in the 1860s, the 1960s and today. It was the beginning of change and reminds us that we should continue to strive to complete that change, until we as a nation truly believe and demonstrate through our actions that all men are created equal. Everyone should read this important document at least once, including Julie Zieman Childs.
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The Emancipation Strategy - National Geographic

While the Emancipation Proclamation did not free a single slave, it was an important turning point in the war, transforming the fight to preserve.
Abraham Lincoln

Emancipation Proclamation

Emancipation Proclamation , edict issued by U. Abraham Lincoln on January 1, , that freed the slaves of the Confederate states in rebellion against the Union. Before the start of the American Civil War , many people and leaders of the North had been primarily concerned merely with stopping the extension of slavery into western territories that would eventually achieve statehood within the Union. With the secession of the Southern states and the consequent start of the Civil War, however, the continued tolerance of Southern slavery by Northerners seemed no longer to serve any constructive political purpose. Emancipation thus quickly changed from a distant possibility to an imminent and feasible eventuality. Lincoln had declared that he meant to save the Union as best he could—by preserving slavery, by destroying it, or by destroying part and preserving part.

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, , as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free. Despite that expansive wording, the Emancipation Proclamation was limited in many ways. It applied only to states that had seceded from the Union, leaving slavery untouched in the loyal border states. It also expressly exempted parts of the Confederacy that had already come under Northern control.

Emancipation Proclamation, edict issued by U.S. Pres. Abraham Lincoln on January 1, , that freed the slaves of the Confederate states in rebellion against the Union. of the constitutionality of his Emancipation Proclamation, Lincoln urged Congress to abolish slavery.
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The Limitations of the Document

The Emancipation Proclamation changed the focus of the Civil War from being primarily about preserving the union to the abolition of slavery., View in National Archives Catalog.

The Emancipation Proclamation is arguably one of the top ten most important documents in the history of the United States; however, it is also one of the most misunderstood. Here are ten facts providing the basics on the proclamation and the history surrounding it. Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation on September 22nd, It stipulated that if the Southern states did not cease their rebellion by January 1st, , then Proclamation would go into effect. When the Confederacy did not yield, Lincoln issued the final Emancipation Proclamation on January 1st,

3 thoughts on “Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln

  1. The Emancipation Proclamation is arguably one of the top ten most important documents in the history of the United States; however, it is also one of the most.

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